Loreena Thiessen: Something Old, Something New

by Loreena Thiessen

January is about new things. A brand new year has begun, 2019. The old year, 2018, is in the past.

A new year is exciting. A fresh new snow fall makes everything around you look new. You look forward to what the New Year will bring. You may already have new things, new mitts, a new scarf, and a new toque. Perhaps some new toys and books.

Now you’re back in school. A new term has begun. Perhaps you’ll make a new friend. You may learn a new skill. You’ll read a new book. And this year you’ll have another birthday. You’ll be a whole year older.

New things are exciting. But what about the old things? They are not gone. They remain as important as ever. What are these old things?

First, there are old buildings. Old buildings tell us of a certain time. They have history. What was happening when they were built? Why was a particular building built? Was it an important business that helped the community to grow? What is the style of the building, the architecture or design? What were the materials used to build it? Was it stone, or wood? All of these tell us about that time, perhaps long ago now.

Then there are old stories. Old stories you may have heard many times before. They make you feel good because you know them well. Maybe you feel you are a part of the story because you have experienced something similar. Take, for example, the stories of Winnie the Pooh. You may have had your own stuffed animal you took with you wherever you went. You thought of it as real, a real companion. You may have created stories about it.

Sometimes old things become new again. This means they have a new use. Look through a collection of old buttons. Your grandmother may have some. Is there a particularly pretty or unique button? Put it on a ribbon and wear it as a necklace. An old button can become a board game piece to replace a lost one. An old bottle can be used as a vase. An egg carton can be used to organize and store small items like a pin collection or stickers. Do you have old Christmas decorations? Each one will have a back story. How old is it? Where did you get it? Why is it still important to you?

Old things connect you to the past, to your history. They help build your story; they are a part of who you are, and what’s important to you.

loreena-thiessen
Loreena Thiessen

What about old sayings? Old sayings have wisdom. They are as true now as they ever were. For example, Smiles are free, but they are worth a lot. Or this one, A journey of a thousand miles begins with the first step. Both of these are to encourage you and show what has value.

There are many old sayings in the Bible that are important. One is in James 1:19: “Everyone should be quick to listen, slow to speak, and slow to become angry.” Proverbs 19:20 says, “Listen to advice and accept instruction and in the end you will be wise.”

Activity: Find an old item.

Need: an old item, camera, drawing paper, pencil crayons

Do: Choose one item that is old and is important to you.

What is its story? Find out what it was used for? Where did it come from? Who owned it?

Why was it important? You may want an adult to help you.

Take a picture of it or draw it.

Find a new use for it.

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